Vintage Margot de Taxco Sterling Silver Blue Enamel Necklace Black Ginkgo Leaf

Vintage Margot de Taxco Sterling Silver Blue Enamel Necklace Black Ginkgo Leaf
Vintage Margot de Taxco Sterling Silver Blue Enamel Necklace Black Ginkgo Leaf
Vintage Margot de Taxco Sterling Silver Blue Enamel Necklace Black Ginkgo Leaf
Vintage Margot de Taxco Sterling Silver Blue Enamel Necklace Black Ginkgo Leaf
Vintage Margot de Taxco Sterling Silver Blue Enamel Necklace Black Ginkgo Leaf
Vintage Margot de Taxco Sterling Silver Blue Enamel Necklace Black Ginkgo Leaf
Vintage Margot de Taxco Sterling Silver Blue Enamel Necklace Black Ginkgo Leaf
Vintage Margot de Taxco Sterling Silver Blue Enamel Necklace Black Ginkgo Leaf

Vintage Margot de Taxco Sterling Silver Blue Enamel Necklace Black Ginkgo Leaf

This spectacular necklace is masterfully crafted in a classically elegant and feminine motif that has a wonderful art deco look. Margot consistently marked her jewelry with a design number and her all sterling silver pieces were numbered 5100 through 5790 this set is design #5708. The necklace has exquisite detail a very feminine and ethereal design most definitely one of Margot's finest motifs!

The necklace measures 18 in length. The silver has acquired a wonderful, soft patina that reflects the shadows created by the depth of the designs. We have NOT polished this necklace as we know some people prefer them this way, they will brighten dramatically if the winner chooses to polish them. Vintage MARGOT art-to-wear pieces are becoming harder to find on the market and are sought by serious vintage Taxco jewelry collectors worldwide this is an authentic VINTAGE Margot de Taxco necklace, not a new piece made from Margot's jewelry molds. This set is extremely well made and crafted in an elegant and timeless design. Minor enamel chipping but doesn't distract from the overall appeal and beauty. MARGOT DE TAXCO, STERLING, MADE IN MEXICO, 5708 (design number), and the Eagle 16 assay mark. MARGOT VAN VOORHIES CARR/MARGOT DE TAXCO is shown on pages 205-207 of Bille Hougart's highly respected source book. The Little Book of Mexican Silver Trade and Hallmarks. This is an EXTRAORDINARY sterling silver piece that was produced in Taxco, Mexico, after 1948, by silver maestra, MARGOT van VOORHIES CARR? 1985 of MARGOT de TAXCO. Margot moved to Mexico City with friends from San Francisco in 1937. She was introduced to Antonio Castillo by Antonio's sister, Maria. Antonio and Margot married while Antonio was still working for William Spratling's Las Delicias.

With Margot and his brothers. Margot and Antonio divorced after about 10 years and Margot opened MARGOT DE TAXCO. "As the Stars are to the Night, So are Jewels to the Woman" was on her calling card this statement represents Margot's dedication to designing classical and feminine art-to-wear jewelry that is elegantly timeless. Margot is most famous for her works in enamels on silver and her devotion to Art Deco, Mayan and Japanese-inspired motifs that could be adapted to either silver or enamel.

Her clients included such Hollywood celebrities as John Wayne and Lana Turner, who visited Margots Taxco silver shop every year. Penny Morrill, well known author and one of the world's leading authorities on vintage Mexican silver has completed her book. Margot Van Voorhies The Art of Mexican Enamelwork. Margot de Taxco jewelry is a wonderful investment and the value will only appreciate with time. An awesome piece for anyone that enjoys original and historical pieces of fine jewelry!

Jewelry is our specialty so if you have an. Interest in other great deal's be sure and bookmark us and cli.

The history of silver in Taxco is a fascinating combination of legend and fact. Located in the hills between Acapulco and about 100 miles Southwest of Mexico City, Taxco in the state of Guerrero is one of the oldest mining sites located in the Americas.

It has retained its natural charm with its colonial ambiance, red-tiled roofs, cobblestoned, narrow winding streets and the towering, impressive 240 year old Santa Prisca Catheral. It's natural wealth of silver attracted early Conquistadors. Before the Spanish arrived the native Indians called it Tlacho meaning the place of the ballgame.

According to local legend the Aztecs had the locals pay tribute to them with gold bars. Hernan Cortes arrived and the Spanish conquered the Aztecs in 1521.

A year afterwards Cortes staked his mining claim in Taxco. By the end of the century, silver from Taxco had spread across Europe, and remote Taxco was reknowed for its wealth of silver. It had become Spain's primary source in the New World of precious metals and had become a busy mining area. Mining gradually decreased in the Taxco area as other richer and more accessible mining areas were discovered and developed, and eventually faded out for almost 200 years.

In 1716 Don Jose de la Borda (a Spaniard of French descent) rediscovered silver in Taxco, when as legend has it, he was riding and wandering in the hills of Taxco and he spotted a rich silver vein. During Mexico's 19th century war for Independence the Spanish barons destroyed their mines rather than lose them to the revolutionaries, and the art of silver work died out in Taxco for quite some time. In the late 1920's the highway from Mexico City finally reached Taxco and in 1926, William Spratling, a U.

Citizen and associate architecture professor from Tulane University arrived in Taxco to study Mexico and its culture. In 1929 he moved to Mexico and was welcomed into the influential artistic circles of Mexico.

Ambassor Dwight Morrow commented to Mr. Spratling that Taxco had been the site of silver mines for centuries, but unfortunately had never been considered a location where jewelry and objects of silver were designed and made. This seemingly insignificant comment changed the course of Taxco's artistic and economic history.

Spratling discovered the potential talent in the locals and motivated the community artisans to create designs and rediscover the craft of silversmithing. With his own designs he created an apprentice system of training young silversmiths with artistic talent and gave them the opportunity to develope their skill. He brought in from Iguala a highly regarded goldsmith to teach the art of working precious metal. The great beauty and craftmanship coming out of Taxco earned worldwide recognition and fame once again for Mexico.

Over time many of these artisans opened workshops and stores of their own- all encouraged by his unwavering support. Now considered the great old masters of Mexican Silver, Mr. Antonio Pineda along with former fellow apprentices the Castillos, Ledesma, and Chino Ruiz have produced and continue to craft some of the most highly regarded, collectable pieces of art, vases, serving sets and jewelry. Their work continues to inspire the next generation of silversmiths and artisans who now number in the hundreds. We have acquired a collection of some very fine mid 1800's to early 1900's , rings, bracelets, pins, and brooches and other assorted items. An amazing variety of styles, designs, and themes and all of the finest quality. We have listed at Bargain Prices! Be sure to add me to your favorites list.

You Like Antique & Vintage Jewelry? You are going to want to Check Back with us Frequently! We will be listing a ton of Fabulous Pieces over the next few months!

Powered by SixBit's eCommerce Solution. The item "Vintage Margot de Taxco Sterling Silver Blue Enamel Necklace Black Ginkgo Leaf" is in sale since Friday, September 02, 2016. This item is in the category "Jewelry & Watches\Vintage & Antique Jewelry\Vintage Ethnic/Regional/Tribal\Mexican, Latin American". The seller is "vierksjewelry" and is located in Lafayette, Indiana.

This item can be shipped to United States.


Vintage Margot de Taxco Sterling Silver Blue Enamel Necklace Black Ginkgo Leaf